Pollen levels will be high in England this week - here’s the full Met Office forecast

Monday, 3rd August 2020, 12:10 pm
Updated Monday, 3rd August 2020, 12:12 pm
Unfortunately for sufferers of hay fever, the recent warm weather has brought with it an influx of pollen (Photo: Shutterstock)
Unfortunately for sufferers of hay fever, the recent warm weather has brought with it an influx of pollen (Photo: Shutterstock)

Unfortunately for sufferers of hay fever, the recent warm weather has brought with it an influx of pollen. Levels will be particularly high this week across England.

Here’s the expected forecast.

This week’s pollen forecast

Monday 3 August will see a high pollen count across all areas of England, according to the Met Office.

Levels will remain high on Tuesday (4 Aug) in West and East Midlands, South West, London & South East and the East, but will drop to medium levels in the North West, North East and Yorkshire & Humber.

Wednesday (5 Aug) will then see high levels of pollen in most areas of England, except from the North West and South West, where medium levels are expected.

A high pollen count will return across the board on Thursday (6 Aug) in all areas of England, with Friday (7 August) forecast the same.

How is the pollen count measured?

The Met Office ranks the pollen count as low, moderate, high, and very high. If you are a hay fever sufferer, it’s more likely that you’ll develop symptoms if you spend time outside in areas of ‘moderate’ pollen levels.

“Grass pollen is the most common allergen (May to July), but tree (February to June) and weed (June to September) pollens can also cause the allergic reaction we know as hay fever,” notes Allergy UK.

What the pollen count levels mean

According to the Met Office, this is what the current pollen count levels mean:

Very high: Very high grass pollen risk during dry, sunny weather. Weed pollen: high risk. Fungal spores: Alternaria and Cladosporium high during warm weather and other types high during warm, humid nights

High: Very high grass pollen risk during dry, sunny weather. Weed pollen: high risk. Fungal spores: Alternaria and Cladosporium high during warm weather and other types high during warm, humid nights.

Medium: High grass pollen risk. Weed pollen: very little risk. Fungal spores: medium.

When are pollen levels the highest?

According to Allergy UK, pollen levels tend to be highest first thing in the morning and at the end of the day. If you do go outside, it’s best to do so during the middle of the day, and then to stay inside in the evening.

“Pollen levels are at their highest at the beginning of the day, when they rise with the warming air, and at the end of the day when it’s cooling down,” said Allergy UK.

“Counts will increase in dry warm weather, especially if it’s windy. So avoid going outside – and especially avoid strenuous activity – at these times.”