Celebrating the 20th anniversary of a hugely-significant Iron Age archaeological find near Harborough

The Hallaton Treasure, featuring over 5,000 coins, mysterious offerings and a stunningly unique 1st century Roman cavalry helmet, was found in November 2000
The Hallaton Treasure, featuring over 5,000 coins, mysterious offerings and a stunningly unique 1st century Roman cavalry helmet, was found in November 2000.The Hallaton Treasure, featuring over 5,000 coins, mysterious offerings and a stunningly unique 1st century Roman cavalry helmet, was found in November 2000.
The Hallaton Treasure, featuring over 5,000 coins, mysterious offerings and a stunningly unique 1st century Roman cavalry helmet, was found in November 2000.

A special event is being staged to celebrate the 20th anniversary of a hugely-significant Iron Age archaeological find near Market Harborough.

The Hallaton Treasure, featuring over 5,000 coins, mysterious offerings and a stunningly unique 1st century Roman cavalry helmet, was found in November 2000.

Harborough Museum, based at the Symington Building on Adam and Eve Street, Market Harborough, is now marking two decades since the priceless haul was discovered.

Museum staff are holding a live Facebook discussion on the historic find at 1.30pm on Monday November 23.

They will be joined by Ken and Hazel Wallace of the Hallaton Field Work Group, who found the first pieces of the Hallaton Treasure, Vicki Score, Director of University of Leicester Archaeological Services and the Hallaton Treasure project, conservator Marilyn Hockey, formerly of the British Museum and Helen Sharp, Curator of Archaeology at Leicestershire County Council.

The panel will talk about their expertise, involvement and experience of finding the Hallaton Treasure - and bringing it to its current home in Harborough Museum.

“The discussion will also explore how understanding has changed in the past 20 years and which stories are still left to be uncovered.

People who want to get involved can log on and ask the panel questions during the Q&A section of the event,” said Harborough Museum.

“Questions can be submitted in advance using Facebook Messenger or you can ask a question on the day - and we will try to answer as many as possible.”

The Hallaton Treasure was discovered by metal detectorist Ken Wallace and other volunteers from the Hallaton Fieldwork Group as they found items including Iron Age coins and Roman pottery.

Along with the Hallaton Fieldwork group, University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS) began excavating what turned out to be one of the most precious important Iron Age sites in Britain.