Figures show that five Leicestershire Police officers have been arrested for sexual offences over the last four years

Two of the county force’s employees were sacked after facing sexual misconduct hearings

Monday, 11th October 2021, 4:09 pm
Five Leicestershire Police officers have been arrested for sexual offences over the last four years, it has emerged today.

Five Leicestershire Police officers have been arrested for sexual offences over the last four years, it has emerged today.

And two of the county force’s employees were sacked after facing sexual misconduct hearings, new data released under the Freedom of Information Act has revealed.

The force has a total strength of about 3,619 officers and staff.

Meanwhile, four hearings into sexual misconduct by Northamptonshire Police officers were held between 2016 and 2020.

Two of the officers were involved in incidents with members of the public and two with police colleagues.

One was dismissed, one resigned before he could be fired and two were given written warnings.

Some 2,000 police officers all over the country have been accused of sexual misconduct, including rape, since 2017, an investigation by The Times reveals today.

In almost two thirds of cases officers accused of sexual violence and abusing their power for personal gratification faced no further action.

The in-depth newspaper inquiry has been carried out days after serving Met Police officer PC Wayne Couzens, 48, was jailed for life for the brutal abduction, rape and murder of Sarah Everard, 33.

The horrifying killing of Sarah has sparked powerful new calls for much tougher action to combat widespread misogyny and a crackdown on violence against girls and women.

Asked by the Harborough Mail today for a comment on sexual misconduct offences involving police, a Leicestershire Police spokeswoman said they would “not deviate from the national statement given out this morning”.

This is the statement put out earlier today by the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC): “Without question, it’s expected and important in terms of accountability and public trust for every force to demonstrate the greatest levels of transparency possible around misconduct hearings and outcomes.

“Hearings are chaired by a Chief Constable where evidence is incontrovertible and a misconduct hearing is an accelerated one, but all others are overseen by an Independent Legally Qualified Chair, appointed by the Local Policing Body and not the police force.

“The Chair decides if a misconduct hearing is held in public taking into consideration crucial factors such as the vulnerability, physical and mental health or the welfare of witnesses who may or may not be called upon to give evidence, the naming of children or whether holding a hearing in public would jeopardise criminal proceedings.”

The NPCC added: “Police officers and former officers dismissed under Conduct Regulations are placed on the published version of the barred list for five years, though there are exemptions, for example again where publication might prejudice an investigation or other criminal or civil proceedings.

“Regulations state clearly the requirement to publish the outcomes of misconduct hearings, but it will be for the local police force to manage how long information is published for.”