Campaign launched after a young Harborough woman was murdered  is backing a high-profile nationwide drive to stamp out stalking

The Alice Ruggles Trust are throwing their weight behind National Stalking Awareness Week this week

By Red Williams
Tuesday, 26th April 2022, 5:28 pm
Alice and her mum Sue

A campaign launched after a young Harborough woman was murdered by her ex-boyfriend is backing a high-profile nationwide drive to stamp out stalking this week.

Dr Sue Hills and her husband Prof Clive Ruggles set up the Alice Ruggles Trust after their daughter Alice, 24, was tragically killed by Trimaan Dhillon in Gateshead in October 2016.

Dhillon, who relentlessly stalked Alice when she ended their brief relationship, was convicted of Alice’s murder in April 2017 and jailed for a minimum of 22 years.

Alice Ruggles

Now Dr Hills, of Church Langton, near Market Harborough, and the Alice Ruggles Trust are throwing their weight behind National Stalking Awareness Week this week.

The Trust, along with other key stakeholders and members of the National Stalking Consortium, will be marking the initiative with a range of events and activities.

This year’s theme, Bridging The Gap, highlights the vital role that stalking advocates play in bridging the gap between the victim and the criminal justice system.

The Alice Ruggles Trust have launched the Welsh version of their three-minute animated video, highlighting the dangers of stalking and the need to seek help.

The Alice Ruggles Trust are throwing their weight behind National Stalking Awareness Week this week.

It will delivered into schools throughout Wales.

The office of the Domestic Abuse Commissioner has also released a new blog featuring the work of the Alice Ruggles Trust.

Clive has spoken to Dyfed-Powys Police while Sue will also talk to Devon and Cornwall Police on Friday.

“On social media during the week, the Alice Ruggles Trust will be exploring and promoting the supporting role that family and friends can play in incidences of stalking.

“Throughout the week we will be highlighting our campaign for dedicated funding to guarantee a minimum of two independent stalking advocates (ISACs) in every police force area,” said the Trust. “The intervention of an ISAC could have made a critical difference in Alice’s case, as they do in so many others, yet the funding available for ISACs remains tiny compared with the prevalence of stalking.”

Talking about the Alice Ruggles Trust, Clive says: “Alice was kind, clever and beautiful.

“She had an infectious personality and an incredible sense of humour - she saw the fun side of everything.

“She loved life, loved her friends and loved her job.

“She had so much to live for.

“On 26 April 2017, Trimaan Dhillon was convicted of Alice’s murder and sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum tariff of 22 years,” said Clive.

“His controlling behaviour during their brief relationship had developed afterwards into a relentless campaign of stalking.

“Stalking is a pattern of unwanted, fixated and obsessive behaviour. “Its impact on victims is severe.

“It can cause high levels of alarm and distress, affect mental and physical health and in high-risk cases, can lead to violence and death.”

The fourth Alice Ruggles Trust conference will be held on Thursday, October 13, 2022 in Leicester.

The event will focus on the threats and dangers of cyberstalking.

You can find out more about the Alice Ruggles Trust on their website here: https://www.alicerugglestrust.org/