Interview: Comedian Ed Byrne chats ahead of Corby date

Ed Byrne
Ed Byrne

With the political arena so deeply divided, many comedians have used humour to tackle the difficult subject.

Ed Byrne is no different in his new show, Spoiler Alert, coming to The Core at Corby Cube on Friday November 25 towards the end of the month.

For the show, Ed extends his analysis on the culture of entitlement to look at areas where we could perhaps do with being spoiled a little bit more.

He said: “Where I think we’re not acting spoiled enough is in the political arena. We have a tendency to accept what’s happening and that’s where we should be acting more entitled: we are literally entitled to the government we want.

“We’re spoiled in all these little ways, but not spoiled enough.

“I was telling the story of the electric fence for a while, and then suddenly it struck me that it was Brexit in microcosm.

“I don’t want to alienate half of the population or maybe a third of my audience, but it works as an analogy whichever side you’re on.

“The government told you not to do this and that it would be a terrible idea, but you said no, we want to do it anyway’. So now we’re doing it and it’s proving a terrible idea. I do think it’s a fair analogy."

Spoiler Alert also continues a theme that he’s tackled in previous shows, that of his gradual shift from being a working-class Dubliner to a fully paid-up rural-residing member of the middle classes. Where once he would do routines slating 4x4 owners, he is now the proud(ish) owner of such a vehicle. And in the poster for his tour, he brandishes other signifiers of social mobility: a bowtie and chainsaw.

“It’s one of two I own: that one is the smaller of the two,” Ed remarks of his chainsaw rather than his neckwear. “I use it for firewood, both for my wood burning stove and also for the barbecue. The first time I used one I was fine, though I think it worried my parents that I had bought a chainsaw.”

Having premiered Spoiler Alert at the Edinburgh Fringe and used the month of August to hone the show, it is fully ready to go. “Being on stage is enjoyable and this part of the writing process is enjoyable. The empty page though is a scary thing. On the first leg of the tour l’ll do about an hour and 15 minutes, plus I’ll have a support act.

"I keep a tour diary now of places where the curries are disappointing and where they are good and where audiences have been good before."

The show starts at 8pm and is recommended for aged 14 plus. To book visit www.thecorecorby.com