The 10,000-mile family journey to Foxton

The plaque on the wall of Foxton village hall records the deaths 70 years ago of the Australian crew of a Lancaster bomber that crashed near the village.
The plaque on the wall of Foxton village hall records the deaths 70 years ago of the Australian crew of a Lancaster bomber that crashed near the village.

The plaque on the wall of Foxton village hall records the deaths 70 years ago of the Australian crew of a Lancaster bomber that crashed near the village.

And remarkably the two people reading it are relatives of the pilot of the plane.

Colin Paton (left) and Lyndal Burke are the niece and nephew of Second World War pilot Flying Officer Colin Richardson of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF).

They travelled 10,000 miles from Australia to pay their respects to their uncle.

F/O Richardson’s plane crashed in April 1945 near Foxton, after being diverted to a Leicestershire airfield in bad weather. The pilot and crew were all killed.

It was villager Stuart Warriner who tracked down members of F/O Richardson’s family in Australia.

“It was great that two members of the pilot’s family could fly over to mark the 70th anniversary of the crash” Mr Warriner said.

Mr Warriner accompanied Colin and Lyndal and their partners to a reunion at Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre in East Kirkby, once the home of Mr Richardson’s 630 squadron.

Mrs Burke said: “The visit was very special to us, and when I relayed everything to our mother June, who turns 90 this year, she became very emotional.

“She thought it was just wonderful that we could be here in the UK where her brother had flown Lancasters during World War II.”