How doing the chores has helped James win a brand-new bike in Harborough - and raise money for charity

A hard-working youngster is riding a brand-new bike after winning a competition to boost research into a deadly illness.

Monday, 30th December 2019, 10:46 am
Updated Thursday, 2nd January 2020, 9:40 am
The winner James Thompso, 9, collects the bike from Meriel Buxton, chairman, and Neil Holman of George Halls Cycle Centre and also sponsored by King West.

Delighted James Thompson, nine, won the contest staged by Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland Committee for the Cure Parkinson’s Trust.

His grandmother Carolynn Thompson said: “We’re all very proud of James and he’s thrilled with his new bike.”

Carolynn, who’s heavily involved with the successful regional charity, said 18 children aged from four to 16 entered the competition.

Pedal power...James Thompson, 9, winner of the Cure Parkinson Trust bike raffle with from left Carolynn Thompson (grandmother) Neil Holman of George Halls Cycle Centre and Meriel Buxton, chairrman of the Cure Parkinson Trust Local group.

“James took part along with his sisters Sophie, 11, and Isabel, six.

“They carried out chores for their mum and dad such as bringing in the logs, doing the washing up and hoovering up,” she said.

“They really were busy bees and as a result raised £120 for us.

“James was lucky enough to draw the winning ticket and win the bike.”

The winner James Thompson, 9, collects the bike from Meriel Buxton, chairman, and Neil Holman of George Halls Cycle Centre and also sponsored by King West.

Carolynn, of Grandborough, near Rugby, said the popular event was sponsored by Market Harborough-based estate agents King West, who contributed £300.

And the bicycle was donated by George Halls Cycle Centre of Northampton Road, Harborough.

“They were both very sweet to help us out and get behind us – we really appreciate their support,” said Carolynn.

King West donated £300 altogether, including a £100 cash prize for Omar Curtis-Bennett, 10, who raised the most money.

“He did ever so well, collecting £150 all by himself,” said Carolynn.

“The children all worked very hard.

“And now they are all much more aware of the work our charity does trying to find a cure for Parkinson’s disease.

“It’s a horrible illness and is striking more and more people as we live longer.

“As a local committee we raise up to £40,000 a year and the sooner experts can end this terrible threat once and for all the better.”