Meet the nine crooked travellers

ONLY one of the nine travellers who pleaded guilty to being part of a car 'clocking' scam ever paid tax.

ELVIS Biddle, right, and his girlfriend Priscilla Devlin, below, had lived at Justin Park for about 12 years at the time of the raids.

In their case summary, prosecutors said that neither of the couple has had any legitimate form of accountable or recorded income during their lifetime and inquiries with the Inland Revenue have shown that neither has any tax profile. More than 140,000 of recent expenditure was discovered including the purchase of many luxury items.

Elvis Biddle used a false name, Elvis Green, to advertise vehicles in Autotrader. He admitted one charge of conspiracy to convert criminal property into cash, two of converting criminal property, one of attempting to convert criminal property and seven of obtaining property by deception.

Priscilla admitted the possession of criminal property, including 4,850 and 800 euros in cash.

BOYSIE Biddle, right, and Bobby Biddle, below, are sons of John and Florence Biddle and the younger brothers of Elvis.

The two had met with representatives from Autotrader to sell vehicles and had given false names.

Boysie admitted charges of conspiracy to convert criminal property, converting criminal property, obtaining property by deception, attempting to obtain property by deception and handling stolen goods.

Bobby also admitted conspiracy to convert criminal property and three charges of obtaining property by deception.

Despite their lavish lifestyles John and Florence Biddle, pictured right and below, have never registered for, nor paid, any income tax.

John Biddle said he had traded cars and horses for 50 years and that he hadn't paid any income tax as he could not afford to.

However, he told police he did pay his water rates.

About 370,000 worth of goods were recovered from the home they shared with two of their three sons, Bobby and Boysie, at Justin Park.

Florence Biddle admitted using the Autotrader to advertise the vehicles and she told the police that their business had a good turnover.

She admitted that she had recently lost a lot of money in an investment and that she had also purchased a Rolex watch for her son using her family allowance.

John and Florence both admitted conspiracy to convert criminal property and four charges each of obtaining property by deception.

HEATH and Sherry Stretton (right and below)also lived at Justin Park and neither defendant has ever registered for, or paid income tax.

Despite their expenditure, Sherry Stretton claimed dishonest benefits payments or more than 19,000. In interview, she was asked about numerous luxury items that had been found in her home including 106,000 in jewellery, Rolex watches and expensive designer clothes.

She said the money had come from her husband Heath Stretton, although she admitted purchasing some of the items using cash provided by her husband.

Heath Stretton lied to the police about an Autotrader account that was set up in the name of Mr Heath of 17 Justin Park.

The account was used to advertise clocked and stolen vehicles and Heath Stretton was identified as Mr Heath by an Autotrader representative who had met him to organise the sale of vehicles.

Heath Stretton admitted charges of conspiracy to convert criminal property, converting criminal property, possession of criminal property, obtaining property by deception, attempting to obtain property by deception, and handling stolen goods.

Sherry Stretton admitted possessing 106,000 worth of jewellery which was criminal property as well as the dishonest benefits claim.

GRAHAM Bold, right, was the only defendant who had ever paid income tax and told police he had been a vehicle technician all his life. He told the police that he had been unemployed for over a decade because of incapacity and that his only income was 70 per week incapacity benefit and a 70 per week pension from when he had worked for the Royal Mail. Bold pleaded guilty to a charge of obtaining property by deception.