Young Alex Goodwin takes his first steps on his telescopic leg bone

Alex Goodwin gets used to his new telescopic leg bone.
Alex Goodwin gets used to his new telescopic leg bone.

Transatlantic cancer patient Alex Goodwin, aged 10, has taken his first steps on his amazing telescopic leg bone at a Kansas hospital.

Alex had the metal femur inserted into his leg in a pioneering operation at the University of Kansas Hospital last week.

Young Alex Goodwin takes his first steps with his telescopic leg bone

Young Alex Goodwin takes his first steps with his telescopic leg bone

Two days later, he was taking his first tentative steps on his “new” leg, with the help of a zimmer.

He told supporters in a video on his Facebook page: “I’m back from hospital now and everything’s doing fine with my leg.

“It’s in this cast and I’m quite sorry there aren’t any messages yet but it’s been quite a rough time.”

Alex, from a village near Lutterworth, came to America five months ago with his family in search of radical treatment for his cancer.

He was suffering from a rare form of bone cancer called Ewing Sarcoma, and his prognosis in England was bleak.

His dad and mum - Jeff and Maria - scoured the world for alternative treatment, and then decided to “go public” in a bid to raise money for treatment in America.

With help from around the world, including Jeff’s police colleagues, they raised tens of thousands of pounds for Alex’s treatment and recuperation.

“Alex’s plight really struck a chord with the police family” said Jeff.

In the latest operation, Alex had a metal leg bone inserted into his right leg to replace his own femur, which had been attacked by cancer.

The artificial bone - made in England - can be extended by magnets within Alex’s leg, as he grows.

Alex has already had chemotherapy, surgery and radiation which seem to have overcome the cancer.

Now he faces months of physiotherapy on his ‘new’ leg that also has an artificial hip and knee.

Dad Jeff, a police officer with Warwickshire police and based in Rugby, told the Kansas City Star newspaper: “Every day genuinely is a blessing.

“The fact that he is still here and fighting and we’ve got through the worst of it now ... it’s good. I’m really happy.”

Alex should return to home - and his Harborough school - next term.

Even after all the treatment, experts say there is still a 50:50 chance that the cancer will return.

But Jeff said although Alex has been very ill, he is still outgoing and upbeat.

“Alex is very gentle, very astute and very positive” he said.