Inside the town’s new antiques centre

Front, owner Timmy Makra with Kathleen Kettle and Sally McDonald at the Market Harborough Antiques Centre on St Mary's Road.
PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

Front, owner Timmy Makra with Kathleen Kettle and Sally McDonald at the Market Harborough Antiques Centre on St Mary's Road. PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

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A new antiques centre in Market Harborough is to have its official grand opening on Monday, May 1.

Harborough Antiques Centre, off St Mary’s Road, has actually been building up its business since January, and expects to have 40 retailers and a cafe on board by May.

Lots of furniture and smaller items on show.
PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

Lots of furniture and smaller items on show. PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

All the retailers are local people, who rent space at the centre from £30 a month.

The dealers themselves are not typically present. All their goods are carefully labelled, so when they are sold, the centre knows which dealer to send the cash to.

The business owner is Mrs Timea “Timmy” Makra (47), who lives in Cottingham, Northamptonshire.

“I had a flower business in Market Harborough that I sold four years ago” she said.

Lots of unusual items on display.
PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

Lots of unusual items on display. PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

“I’ve been looking for a new business opportunity and this seemed ideal.

“We’ve got a great space here (3,000 square feet), and all our dealers are local people who know their areas very well.”

Harborough Antiques Centre is open now, and will open six days a week - not Mondays, except for Bank Holiday Mondays.

It sells antiques, vintage, retro, up-cycled and some handmade craft items.

A carved wooden elephants head.
PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

A carved wooden elephants head. PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

“We know the town’s Indoor Market has antiques and retro days, but we complement them” said Timmy.

“Visitors looking for antiques will visit more than one place in one go - they might spend a whole day visiting antique centres and charity shops.

“They want several places to visit close to each other, so we will be sending people to the market and then people come from Gildings to here.”

She said some of her dealers make a living from antiques, and for others it’s a hobby.

Lights from a sailing ship.
PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

Lights from a sailing ship. PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

As for goods for sale, they vary from big grandfather clocks to tiny brooches.

World War II Goodyear sign covered with bullet holes.
PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER

World War II Goodyear sign covered with bullet holes. PICTURE: ANDREW CARPENTER